Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician. Aylett Sammes.
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...
Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...

Britannia Antiqua Illustrata: or, the Antiquities of Ancient Britain, Derived from the Phoenician...

London: Printed by Tho. Roycroft, for the Author, 1676. First edition. Hardcover. Folio. [10], 582, [6]pp. Modern 3/4 crushed morocco over black cloth with title laid on spine. Vignette. Title page in red and black lettering. Decorative headpieces and initials. Sammes' elaborate "Britannia Antiqua Illustrata, or the Antiquities of Ancient Britain derived from the Phœnicians" (London, 1676) only appeared as Vol. I. It was licensed by Roger L'Estrange in March 1675, and dedicated to Heneage Lord Finch, baron of Daventry and Lord High Chancellor of England. This interesting work brings down the narrative of British history to the conversion of Kent. It deals with the Roman period, but its main thesis is of the Phœnician derivation of the language. It reproduces ancient documents, such as the Laws of King Ina. The views derived from Strabo and the work of John Twyne. Sammes gave etymological reasons connecting Phoenician with Welsh, but did not accept the descent of the Cymry from Gomer. While the specific historical theories brought forward by Sammes were discounted by his contemporaries, this book was a contribution to a number of debates of the time, and its effect on iconography was major. The representations of Celtic druids had been developed from beginnings in Conrad Celtes and the Jani Anglorum (1610) of John Selden. Inigo Jones had made a druid stage design (1638) for Lodowick Carlell's The Passionate Lovers, drawing on earlier pageant representations of Ancient Britons, as a Wild Man. Further iconographic sources drawn upon were of the Green Man and hermits. As represented in "Britannia Antiqua Illustrata" the druid is a composite of "wild" and "holy." John Wood, the Elder was prepared to take Sammes seriously, in theorizing about Stonehenge. Aylett Sammes died before the completion of this work, probably in 1679 (from Wikipedia). This volume is complete with its large map of Europe, 13 in-text figs, and 12 stunning engravings depicting a druide; the wicker image; a person of the Bretanick Islanders; the battles; Heus; the Hieraglyphicks; Ogmius; Julius Caesar; Drusus Claudius Caesar; Boadicia; Woden-Thor-Friga; Rugyvith-Porevith-Porenuth-Suantovite. Book rebound. Some rubbing on title and along edges. Previous owner's name on title page. Moderate sunning on title page and slight and sporadic age-toning along paper margin. Minor rippling to very first pages. Binding in overall good- to good, interior in good to good+ condition. g. Item #35038

Price: $1,600.00

See all items in History
See all items by