Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Item #49252 Ktisis exaemeros: id est; Historiae creationis examen theologico-philologicum, ita institutum. Johann Heinrich Hottinger.
Ktisis exaemeros: id est; Historiae creationis examen theologico-philologicum, ita institutum
Ktisis exaemeros: id est; Historiae creationis examen theologico-philologicum, ita institutum
Ktisis exaemeros: id est; Historiae creationis examen theologico-philologicum, ita institutum
Ktisis exaemeros: id est; Historiae creationis examen theologico-philologicum, ita institutum

Ktisis exaemeros: id est; Historiae creationis examen theologico-philologicum, ita institutum

Heidelberg: Samuel Browne, University Printer, 1659. First edition. Small quarto. [asterisk]2, 2[asterisk]4, A-2Q4 (= 162 leaves). [12], 311, [1, addenda]pp. Woodcut device at title; lettrines, head- and tailpieces; occasional use of Hebrew fonts. Recent plain boards; edges of text block stained in green. Contemporary annotations throughout. A touch of marginal embrowning at the outermost leaves. A very good, clean copy.

First edition of this detailed theological study of the biblical story of the creation in six days, formulated (as per the title) in 164 “questions”. The official numbering of the questions in the text is 96, however, additional questions have been subordinated under the main headings.The celebrated Swiss theologian, orientalist, and bibliographer Johann Heinrich Hottinger (1620-1667) was born at Zürich, where he studied theology and "oriental" languages, supplemented by his researches in Geneva, Groningen, and Leiden. McClintock and Strong note that Hottinger occupies a distinguished place among those seventeenth-century philologists who sought to promote the knowledge of the semitic languages. "He was one of the first to bring to public notice a number of Syriac and Arabic works by giving extracts from them and biographies of their authors. He also gave a powerful impulse to the study of Oriental languages by establishing at his own expense and Arabic printing-office at Heidelberg while professor in that city. The great aim of his writings was to establish the interpretation of Scripture on a more thoroughly historical and grammatical foundation; yet he rather furnished the means for such a system than established it himself. His works consist chiefly of compilations, and were valuable from the fact that they were from sources previously not generally known. He seldom gives an exegesis, but when he does it is based on grammatical and historical considerations than on dogmatical." This almost single-minded emphasis on philological criticism may be the reason why "Hottinger was among the increasingly small group of Hebraists added to the Roman Catholic Indices after 1600; like Louis de Dieu, all of his works were prohibited" (Burnett). Hebrew works edited by Hottinger include Aaron ha-Levi of Barcelona's Sefer ha-hinukh (Zürich, 1655), and Uri ben Simeon of Biala's Yihus Avot (Heidelberg, 1659). Burnett describes Hottinger's 1658 Promtuarium, sive Bibliotheca Orientalis as "a reader's guide to Jewish literature."

Burnett, Christian Hebraism in the Reformation Era, p.235-236. Niceron, Memoires 8 (1729): 131, no. 18. Toomer, Eastern Wisdome, p.37: “German pupils of Golius at Leiden included Levinus Warner and J. H. Hottinger, who after studying with Pasor at Groningen in 1639 apnd with Golius in 1640-1 became Professor of Oriental languages at his native Zurich. There, and while professor at Heidelberg from 1655 to 1661, he produced several works on Arabic biography and bibliography which, although mediocre, were of some importance in oriental studies for the lack of anything better.” VD17 12:119705C

Annotations: A careful contemporary reader has made underlinings and marginal notes throughout the work, including the addition of page numbers in the opening list of questions by chapter. Item #49252

Greek title: ΚΤΙΣΙΣ ΕΧΑΗΜΕΡΟΣ.

Price: $450.00

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