Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Item #48083 Victimas del Terror Nazi. La Recompensa de los Salvadores [Victims of Nazi Terror. The Reward of the Saviors]. Richmond Temple.
Victimas del Terror Nazi. La Recompensa de los Salvadores [Victims of Nazi Terror. The Reward of the Saviors]
Victimas del Terror Nazi. La Recompensa de los Salvadores [Victims of Nazi Terror. The Reward of the Saviors]
Victimas del Terror Nazi. La Recompensa de los Salvadores [Victims of Nazi Terror. The Reward of the Saviors]
Victimas del Terror Nazi. La Recompensa de los Salvadores [Victims of Nazi Terror. The Reward of the Saviors]

Victimas del Terror Nazi. La Recompensa de los Salvadores [Victims of Nazi Terror. The Reward of the Saviors]

London: Odhams Press Ltd., ca. 1940. First edition. Softcover. Quarto. Unpaginated, 28pp. incl. covers. Original stapled photo-illustrated wraps with whit lettering on cover. Depiction of the Richborough Camp (Kitchener Camp), a deserted military base located on the outskirts of the medieval town of Sandwich at the coast of East Kent turned refugee camp mainly for German and Austrian Jews in February of 1939. At the outbreak of the war it housed about 4,000 refugees.

On September 2, 2019, the 80th anniversary of W.W.II., a blue plaque was unveiled in Sandwich, in the presence of descendants of refugees and the son and daughter of the two philanthropists, Jonas and Phineas May, who ran the camp. The Central British Fund (CBF), today known as World Jewish Relief, organized the transport and rented the derelict army base. Refugees were classified as "friendly aliens" and participated in local community events, published a newsletter and took part in local football games, although refugees were forbidden to work and subject to additional restrictions. After Dunkirk in 1940 public opinion turned against German speaking refugees prompting deportation of the refugees to Canada and Australia and the closure of the camp. (Harriet Sherwood, The Observer, 2019)

This photo-illustrated pamphlet documents daily life of the refugees promoting freedom and uninhibited life. The absence of propaganda places the publication of the pamphlet in 1939. Fifty-five b/w photographs show the refugees during arrival, in daily routines in office settings, during meals, leisure time, counseling sessions as well as cultural renderings and in their barrack style sleeping quarters. Back cover with a full page photograph, a couple with their newborn baby.

A statement by the Archbishop of Canterbury during a visit to the camp touches upon his experiences during studies at the University of Göttingen, getting acquainted with German literature and music. He dignifies the British gesture to establish the camp and thanks the refugees for their help in pursuing the goal to rid Germany and the world from the "horror of constant struggle" to establish enduring peace and harmony and looking forward to seeing not only refugees in the camp but also collaborators in this common cause.

A website in memory of the Kitchener Camp has been established providing additional information on the events surrounding the establishment and existence of the refugee camp, e.g. the Kristallnacht in November 1938, references to publications on the camp, Phineas May's diary, reference books and current events relating to the group's activities. The Kitchener Camp Descendent Groups also has curated a mobile exhibition, shown at the Jewish Museum London from September 1–19, 2019, commemorating 80 years since the establishment of the camp in Richborough. Other then the Library of Congress, there are no OCLC entries.

Text in Spanish. Wraps with light wear along edges, small chips and very light creasing. One and a half inch closed tear at tail of spine. Wraps in overall very good, interior in very good+ condition. vg to vg+. Item #48083

Price: $1,250.00

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