Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete). Henri Gauthier.
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)
Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)

Les temples immergés de la Nubie: Le Temple de Kalabchah. 2-vol. set (Complete)

Le Caire: Imprimerie de l'Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, 1911. First edition. Hardcover. Folio (13 3/4 x 9 3/4"). 168pp (Text), lx (60) leaves + A-D (Plates) (Vol. 1), [2], lv, 169-352pp (Text), lxi-cxvii (61-117) leaves (Plates) (Vol. 2). Modern green cloth library binding, with gold lettering to spines. Original wrappers bound in. Front wraps and title pages in red and black lettering.

Henri Gauthier's work on the inscriptions of the Nubia Temple of Kalabchah is lavishly illustrated with no less than 117 illustrated and photographic plates reproduced in phototype.

Ex-library copy with bookplate on inside of each front cover, and stamps at top and lower paper edges. Minor age-toning to both front wraps. Front wrap of second volume partly taped. Text in French. Binding and interior in overall very good condition. vg. Item #46430

The Temple of Kalabsha (also Temple of Mandulis) is an Ancient Egyptian temple that was originally located at Bab al-Kalabsha (Gate of Kalabsha), approximately 31 miles (50 km) south of Aswan. The temple was situated on the west bank of the Nile River, in Nubia, and was originally built around 30 BC during the early Roman era. While the temple was constructed in Augustus's reign, it was never finished. The temple was a tribute to Mandulis (Merul), a Lower Nubian sun god. It was constructed over an earlier sanctuary of Amenhotep II. The temple is 83 yards (76 m) long and 24 yards (22 m) wide in dimension. While the structure dates to the Roman period, it features many fine reliefs such as "a fine carving of Horus emerging from reeds on the inner curtain wall" of the temple. From Kalabsha's "sanctuary chambers, a staircase leads up to the roof of the temple" where one can see a splendid view of the temple itself and the sacred lake. Several historical records were inscribed on the temple walls of Kalabsha such as "a long inscription carved by the Roman Governor Aurelius Besarion in AD 250, forbidding pigs in the temple" as well as an inscription of "the Nubian king Silko, carved during the 5th century and recording his victory over the Blemmyes and a picture of him dressed as a Roman soldier on horseback." Silko was the Christian king of the Nubian kingdom of Nobatia. When Christianity was introduced to Egypt, the temple was used as a church. (From Wikipedia).

Price: $450.00

See all items in Social Sciences
See all items by