Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language). Sancte Pagnino, Santes Pagnino.
Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language)
Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language)
Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language)
Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language)
Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language)

Thesauri Linguae Sanctae (Treasury of the sacred language)

Leidae (Leiden): Ex Officina Plantiniana Raphelengii, 1609. Later edition. Hardcover. 12mo (7 x 4 1/4"). [16], 495, [1]pp (Text), [1] blank leaf, [62]pp (Index). Contemporary full vellum with handwritten title to spine. Publisher's vignette to title page. Decorative initials.

Originally published in Lyon in 1529, and based on the "Sefer Hashorashim" (Book of Roots) by Rabbi David Kimhi (1160-1235), Santes Pagnino's monumental "Thesauri Linguae Sanctae" is a popular and much reprinted Hebrew-Latin lexicon.

Conceived as a Hebrew-Latin dictionary for Catholic ministers, it was composed during the early 16th century by the celebrated Dominican Bible scholar.

Appended to the dictionary is a list of nominalization patterns and a list of irregular nouns.

Binding age-toned and darkened along spine. Sporadic foxing and age-toning throughout. Clear water-staining along upper part of pages 473 on. Clear water-staining and minor worming along fore-edge of a few Index pages. Text in Hebrew and Latin. Binding in overall fair to good-, interior in good- to very good condition. f to vg. Item #43977

About the author: Santes (or Xantes) Pagnino (Latin: Xanthus Pagninus) (1470-1541) was a Dominican, and one of the leading philologists and Biblical scholars of his day. At sixteen he took the religious habit at San Domenico in Fiesole, where he studied under the direction of Savonarola and other eminent professors. In acquiring the Oriental languages, then cultivated at Florence, he displayed unwonted quicksightedness, ease and penetration. His genius, industry and erudition won him influential friends, among them the Cardinals de Medici, subsequently popes Leo X and Clement VII. As a sacred orator his zeal and eloquence kept abreast with his erudition and were as fruitful. Summoned to Rome by Leo X, he taught at the recently opened free school for Oriental languages until his patron's death (1521). He then spent three years at Avignon and the last seven years of his life at Lyon. Here he was instrumental in establishing a hospital for the plague-stricken, and by his zeal and eloquence, diverted an irruption of Waldensianism and Lutheranism from the city, receiving in acknowledgement the much coveted rights and privileges of citizenship. Here he also was in contact with the polymath and Hebraist Michael Servetus, who he gave his notes to, and designated him as his heir to the scholarly study of the bible after he would have died. The merit of his "Veteris et Novi Testamenti nova translatio" (Lyon, 1527) lies in its literal adherence to the Hebrew, which won for it the preference of contemporary rabbis and induced Leo X to assume the expenses of publication until his death. This version is also notable for introducing verse numbering in the New Testament, although the numbering system used there is not the same as the system used in modern bibles. Several editions of it, as well as of the monumental "Thesaurus linguæ sanctæ" (Lyon, 1529), were brought out by Protestants as well as Catholics. His other works deal with scripture, Greek or Hebrew language. (From Wikipedia).

Price: $250.00

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