Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
A Magyar Országgülés Méltóságos Felsöházábak és Tekintetes Képviselöházának!
A Magyar Országgülés Méltóságos Felsöházábak és Tekintetes Képviselöházának!
A Magyar Országgülés Méltóságos Felsöházábak és Tekintetes Képviselöházának!

A Magyar Országgülés Méltóságos Felsöházábak és Tekintetes Képviselöházának!

Budapest: Pesti Lloyd-nyomada, 1939. First edition. Softcover. Folio. 26pp., published unbound. Original cream stapled wraps with title printed in black to back cover, protected by modern mylar. [To the Honorable Upper and Lower House of the Parliament. Respectful petition of the representatives of the Hungarian Jewish community concerning "Bill No. 72. regarding the restriction of Jews in public and economic life"].

Official petition of the Hungarian Jews regarding the bill of the Second Anti-Jewish, Law No. IV:1939. The Second Anti-Jewish Law was one of a series of anti-Jewish measures passed by the Hungarian Parliament between 1938 and 1941, and the first Hungarian law providing a "racial" definition of the Jewish status according to the Nuremberg Race Law of 1935. Besides of other severe deprivations, it sets a ceiling of six percent, reduced from twenty, of Jews being allowed to work in various financial and commercial professions as well as industrial enter[rises employing more than ten persons. It also excluded the Jews from state administrations and jurisdiction, prohibited Jews from teaching high school, reenacted the Numerus Clausus at universities and partly rescinded their right to vote.

Bill No. 702, the Second Anti-Jewish Law, was drafted by István Antal, state secretary of the Ministry of Justice, and Pál Teleki, Minister of Religion and Education, and was presented for debate before Parliament on December 23, 1938. The petition aimed to sway Parliament to disapprove the law, claiming it being unconstitutional and delinquent in view of legal equality, human rights and the Divine Law, and furthermore relinquishing social justice and threatening national unity, the emancipation granted by the laws of 1849 and 1867, in short, it was deemed to be against the national interest of Hungary. The petition was unsuccessful, the bill was approved by Parliament and was signed into law on May 5, 1939, effecting the Hungarian Jewry severely with more than 90 thousand Jews losing their jobs and thus lowering the living conditions of approximately 220,000 people significantly. (Braham, R.: The Second Anti-Jewish Law, in: The Politics of Genocide: Holocaust in Hungary, New York, Columbia University Press, 1981, pp. 147–156). Scarce important historical document with institutional holdings recorded only in Hungary. Text in Hungarian with slight rubbing to covers. Else in very good condition. vg. Item #43670

Price: $4,500.00

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