Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
ジュネーヴ国際連盟会館設計懸賞競技当選図案集 (Collection of competition designs for the construction of the Palace of the League of Nations, in Geneva)
ジュネーヴ国際連盟会館設計懸賞競技当選図案集 (Collection of competition designs for the construction of the Palace of the League of Nations, in Geneva)
ジュネーヴ国際連盟会館設計懸賞競技当選図案集 (Collection of competition designs for the construction of the Palace of the League of Nations, in Geneva)
ジュネーヴ国際連盟会館設計懸賞競技当選図案集 (Collection of competition designs for the construction of the Palace of the League of Nations, in Geneva)

ジュネーヴ国際連盟会館設計懸賞競技当選図案集 (Collection of competition designs for the construction of the Palace of the League of Nations, in Geneva)

Tokyo: 三光会 (Sankoukai), 1928. First edition. Hardcover. Quarto (10 1/4 x 7 3/4"). [1] leaf (Text), 2-55 loose leaves (Plates), as issued. Original half blue cloth over decorative paper covered portfolio. String ties.

Scarce Japanese portfolio containing 54 plates of photogravures featuring some of the most important competition designs for the construction of the Palace of the League of Nations,* in Geneva.

In 1927, an architectural competition was held to choose a design for the following project:

"The Palace, whose construction is the object of the competition, is intended to house all the organs of the League of Nations in Geneva. It should be designed in such a way as to allow these organs to work, to preside and to hold discussions, independently and easily in the calm atmosphere which should prevail when dealing with problems of an international dimension." (Subject given by the organizers to the participants)

A jury of architects was selected to choose a final design from among 337 entries but was unable to decide on a winner. Ultimately, the five architects behind the leading entries were chosen to collaborate on a final design: Julien Flegenheimer of Switzerland, Camille Lefèvre and Henri-Paul Nénot of France, Carlo Broggi and Giuseppe Vago of Italy. Four of which are featured in the plates. Donations from League members were used for the interior decoration. The Palace of Nations was built between 1929 and 1938, a year before the outbreak of WWII.

The designs contained in this portfolio are from the following 47 architects: Henri-Paul Nénot & Julien Flegenheimer; Erich zu Putlitz, Rudolf Klophaus, & August Schoch; Nils Einar Eriksson; Camille Lefèvre; Carlo Broggi, Giuseppe Vaccaro & Luigi Franzi; Le Corbusier & Pierre Jeanneret; Georges Antoine Pierre Albert Labro; Emil Fahrenkamp & Albert Deneke; Giuseppe Vago; Henrikus Theodorus Wijdeveld; Giuseppe Boni & Adamo Boari; René Patouillard-Demoriane; Paul Bonatz & F. E. Scholer; Pierre & Louis Guidetti; Louis H. Boileau & P. Le Bourgeois; Alfred Fischer-Essen & Richard Speidel; Carl Martin Tage William-Olsson; E. van Linge; Hannes Meyer & Hans Witter; A. Laverrière & Ch. Thévenaz; F. G. Lambert, G. Legendre & Jean Camoletti; Marcello Piacentini, Gaetano Rapisardi & Angiolo Mazzoni; J. M. Luthmann & Hendrik Wouda; J. E. P. Hendrickx & J. M. E. De Ligne; Gustaf Birch-Lindgren; Hakon Ahlberg; and Anton Rosen.

Each of the architects' designs is represented by two plates. Each plate measures 10 1/4 x 7 1/2", and contains one to two images. Image size varies from 8 x 5 3/4" (one image per plate) to 3 x 6" and 4 1/4 x 5 1/2" (two images per plate)

Sporadic and minor rubbing to covers and along edges. String ties partly missing. Offsetting and age-toning to text leaf. Text in Japanese, captions in Japanese and French. Portfolio in overall good, interior in good to very good, plates in fine condition. g to vg. Item #40897

* The League of Nations was an organization founded on January 10, 1920 as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War. It was the first international organization whose principal mission was to maintain world peace. After a number of successes and some early failures in the 1920s, the League ultimately proved incapable of preventing aggression by the Axis powers in the 1930s. Germany withdrew from the League, as did Japan, Italy, Spain, and others. The outbreak of WWII showed that the League had failed its primary purpose, which was to prevent any future world war. The League lasted for 26 years; the United Nations (UN) replaced it after the end of the Second World War on April 20, 1946 and inherited a number of agencies and organizations founded by the League.

Price: $3,750.00