Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)
近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)

近世建築 No.76 1925-8; No.76 1925-9; No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11; No.76 1925-12 巴里万国工芸美術博覧会 (Early Modern Architecture: Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts). 5 Vol.-set (Complete)

(東京)Tokyo: (洪洋社) Koyosha, Inc., 1925. First edition. Hardcover. Rare collection of "Early Modern Architecture," a monthly Japanese magazine which tackled a diverse range of themes, movements and discussions in the fields of architecture and urbanism. Each issue was comprehensively illustrated and accompanied by plans, maps, sections and details. These five consecutive issues of the magazine are entirely dedicated to the famous Paris International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts, a World's fair held in Paris, France, from April to October 1925. This exhibition epitomized what came to be called decades later "Art Deco," a "modern" style characterized by a streamlined classicism, geometric and symmetric compositions, and a sleek machine-age look.

Each issue is a quarto size, and has: [1] loose leaf (Title), 20 loose leaves (Plates), as issued. Original printed paper covered portfolio, with string ties. Title leaves in red lettering (for the first four issues), and blue lettering (fifth issue). Each of the five issues contains 20 photographic plates (size: 10 x 7 1/4") reproduced in stunning photogravure, depicting some of the most prominent landmarks of the Paris exhibition, such as:

- The Porte d'Honneur: The imposing entranceway designed by the firm Favier & Ventre, provided visitors with a stunningly framed view of the Grand Palais. Simulated stone combined with bronze and wrought iron, illuminated by indirect neon light, to give the entrance a sense of majesty by day and mystery by night. Cast-iron reliefs over the gateways celebrated the dignity of labor. Heralding the entry point was "La France," a monumental statue by Antoine Bourdelle, celebrating the arrival of American fighting forces in France in 1917.

- The Hotel du Collectionneur, by Pierre Patout. The striking pavilion was the most ambitious project by an individual designer and the most acclaimed display in the exhibition. It housed a suite of elegant rooms conceived by the leading French furniture maker Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann. Patout himself designed the pavilion, with a vast oval room, the Grand Salon, as its focal point. Ruhlmann brought together many leading artists and designers to decorate the Salon, including Jean Dunand, Jean Dupas, Antoine Bourdelle and Edgar Brandt.

- The Porte de la Concorde, a circle of nine towering square columns designed by Patout, with, heralding the entry point, a female nude christened "L'Accueil" (The Welcome) by Louis Dejean.

- The Soviet pavilion: A stunning architectural work designed and built by Konstantin Melnikov. The wooden structure, employing a combination of single-sloped roofs of different sizes, was regarded as being one of the most progressive buildings at the fair. Unlike other Paris pavilions, it was completed in less than a month, employing not more than ten workers.

- The Pavillon du Tourisme: The Information and Tourism pavilion was designed by Robert Mallet-Stevens, one of the most influential figures in French architecture between the two World Wars. The structure is splendidly enhanced by its 118-feet-tall (36m) campanile.

- Le Pavillon des 4 Tours: The four-tower pavilion (Restaurants and French wines) was designed by architect Charles Plumet.

- The Pavillon des Editions G. Crès et Cie, designed by Georges Beau, Joseph Hiriart, and Georges Henri Tribout. An impressive building with its most interesting sheltered double entrance. The facade was designed to look like three partially opened books.

- The Village du Jouet (Toy Village) designed by Peltier Frères.

- The Dutch pavilion designed by J. F. Staal. Typical of Amsterdam School aesthetics, the building was an astonishing "tour de force," demonstrating the great skill of the Dutch bricklayer. Made of brick, it combined expressive decoration with exotic forms and motifs. - The church-like British pavilion designed by architects Easton & Robertson.

- The Danish pavilion, by architect Kay Fisker.

- The "Au Bon Marché" pavilion, a magnificent building designed by Louis-Hippolyte Boileau. Its rectangular and curved geometric forms blended in a graceful ensemble.

- Grand Palais: Views of the monumental Salle d'Honneur and staircase designed by architect Charles Letrosne. - The ostentatiously geometrical Polish pavilion with its shining glass tower, designed by Jozef Czajkowski, one of the most outstanding pro-national artists of the inter-war 1920s, and a man convinced of the social function of art. - The Belgian pavilion was designed by no other than Victor Horta, the pillar of Art Nouveau.

- The Czech pavilion: Historic styles, folk art and the work of the avant-garde inspired the Czechoslovak displays. The modernistic pavilion, designed by Josef Gocar, took the symbolic and abstracted form of a ship. Its main reception room combined forms derived from the Renaissance with those of Czech Cubism.

- All the various kiosks of the Exposition (Restrooms, Post-office, Cafes, Snack and Telephone kiosks, etc..) with plans and architectural drawings: See all the 40 plates in the third and fourth portfolios (No.76 1925-10; No.76 1925-11)

Also featured is a photo of the winning design the housing category by Shichigoro Yamada (山田七五郎).

Many of the plates depict interior views of the various pavilions, thus showcasing pieces of furniture, glassware, art work and many other items designed by the most renowned artists of the period, such as René Lalique, Gerrit Rietveld, Marcel Breuer, etc..

Minor to moderate rubbing, offsetting, and abrasion to portfolios. Offsetting to title leaves. Minor age-toning along paper margin. Titles and captions in Japanese. Portfolios in overall fair (No.76 1925-11) to very good (No76 1925-12), interior in good+ to very good, images in very good condition. g- to vg. Item #39776

* (洪洋社) Koyosha, Inc. was a prominent and pioneering company in the work of architectural publications in Japan. The company which was founded in 1912 by Yoishitaro Takanashi (1882-1923), was one of the fist publisher of architectural books, and played an important role in the promotional and introduction of various western styles to Japanese architects, through their coverage of international expositions, and Japanese translations of foreign publications. By the time the publisher when out of business in 1944, they had published over 100 books.

Price: $3,750.00

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