Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Presenting Silhouette: A New Pattern in 1847 Rogers Bros Silverplate [WITH POCHOIR PLATES]. Reynaldo Luza.
Presenting Silhouette: A New Pattern in 1847 Rogers Bros Silverplate [WITH POCHOIR PLATES]
Presenting Silhouette: A New Pattern in 1847 Rogers Bros Silverplate [WITH POCHOIR PLATES]
Presenting Silhouette: A New Pattern in 1847 Rogers Bros Silverplate [WITH POCHOIR PLATES]

Presenting Silhouette: A New Pattern in 1847 Rogers Bros Silverplate [WITH POCHOIR PLATES]

Meriden, CT: Rogers Bros Silverplate, International Silver and Co, [1930]. First edition. Softcover. Folio. Unpaginated. [14]pp. Original spiral bound black and silver decorative stiff wrappers. This splendid work introduces "Silhouette," the new silverware pattern from 1847 Rogers Bros.* Illustrated with two tipped-in heliogravures and two striking pochoir plates by Reynaldo Luza, this catalogue was created and printed in Paris by Draeger. Head and tail of spine slightly chipped. Moderate and sporadic creasing to covers. Wrappers in overall good-, interior in very good, pochoir plates in near fine to fine condition. g- to vg. Item #39569

* The Rogers Brothers (Simeon, and William) had established a shop in Hartford, Connecticut in the 1840s. The brothers were known for the high quality of their wares and when they felt they had perfected the electroplating process** in 1847 they marked their product with their name. In 1862 the Rogers brothers moved to Meriden, Connecticut, the center of the Britannia ware industry. Britannia ware, an alloy that resembled pewter, could easily be cast into fancy hollowware pitchers and other decorative articles, which were then electroplated. Rogers Bros. became part of the Meriden Britannia company. The Meriden Britannia company absorbed dozens of other silverware makers in the area and expanded its operation overseas, after which it became known as the International Silver Company. International Silver may have used the 1847 Rogers mark as early as 1852. The successor to the International Silver Company is still in business and uses the 1847 trademark to this day. Popular patterns in 1847 Rogers Bros. include Columbia (1893), Charter Oak (1906), Ancestral (1924), Adoration (1930), First Love (1937), Vintage (1940), and the later version of Daffodil (1950).

** The technique of electroplating a thin coat of silver over a base metal became feasible in the 1840s. The base metal selected for flat tableware was usually nickel silver, a misnomer which actually contained no silver but was an alloy of nickel, zinc and copper.

Price: $950.00

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