Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider. Dvora Fogel, Henryk Streng, Illustr.
Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider
Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider
Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider
Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider
Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider

Tog Figurn [Day-Figures]: Lider

Lemberg: Tsushteyer, 1930. First edition. 8vo, IIpp, 72pp, 4 linoleum cuts on red paper, with tissue guards. Original cream wrappers with red lettering on cover. Dvoyre Fogel (sometimes referred to as “Debora Vogel”) was born in 1902 in Burshtyn (Galicia, now Ukraine) in a non-observant, Polish-speaking home. During World War I the family fled to Vienna and later moved to Lwów, where Fogel spent most of her life. She graduated from the Lwów Jewish gymnasium, where she was active in the Zionist youth movement Ha-Shomer ha-Za’ir and studied philosophy in Vienna and Polish literature in Cracow, receiving her Ph.D. in 1926. Her doctoral dissertation charts the influence of Hegel’s aesthetics upon Jozef Kremer (1806–1875), philosopher and scholar of aesthetics and art history. Fogel taught psychology at a Hebrew teachers’ college in Lwów. In 1932 she married a Lwów architect and engineer named Barenblit. Her only son, Anshel, was born in 1937. Together with her husband and son, Fogel was killed in the Lwów ghetto in 1942. While at the university Fogel wrote German poetry, but gradually became familiar with Yiddish literature and began to write in that language, although it was not spoken in her home. She became active in Yiddish literary circles and wrote articles for various local Yiddish journals as well as for the Polish journals Sygnaty and Wiadmosci Literackie. She participated in the short-lived Lwów Yiddish journal of literature and art Tsushteyer (1929–1931), contributing a two-part essay on the art of Marc Chagall and other art reviews, besides her own poems and essays on poetry. Fogel’s remarkable experimental poetry, all written in the 1930s, was, in the spirit of early twentieth-century art, radically avant-garde and attuned to modernist minimalism. She attempted to fuse modern art and poetry in a new style that she termed “white words,” striving, as she put it, to create a new lyric poetry of the urban condition: a poetry of cool stasis and of geometric ornamentation with a rhythm of repetition that can replace melodiousness and dynamism, in which monotone becomes theme. In her creative prose she employed repetitive detached impressions (“montages”) to achieve the same goals. Contemporary and later critics considered her style too intellectual, studied and obscure, and lacking in traditional Jewish and feminine thematics. Yet Fogel herself regarded her project not as a deliberate experiment, but rather as “a necessity, achieved and paid for with life’s experience.”She published two books of Yiddish poetry—Tog-Figurn (Day-Figures, 1930) and Manekinen (Mannequins, 1934)—and a book of short sketches, Akatsyes Bliyen (Acacias Bloom, 1935) in both Polish and Yiddish. Her poems, prose and essays appeared in New York, in the Introspectivist monthly journal Inzikh (1936, 1937, 1938) and in the quarterly Bodn (1937). Text in Yiddish, Wrappers with light wear along edges, small chips, light creasing at corners and rubbed. Condition of wrappers in good condition, interior in very good condition. Item #39391

Price: $4,500.00

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