Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Schutz-Pass for Alice Rappaport [INITIALED BY WALLENBERG & SIGNED BY DANIELSSON] (with) Letter for Safe Passage for Alice Rappaport [WITH FULL SIGNATURE BY WALLENBERG] (with) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére [Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew]
Schutz-Pass for Alice Rappaport [INITIALED BY WALLENBERG & SIGNED BY DANIELSSON] (with) Letter for Safe Passage for Alice Rappaport [WITH FULL SIGNATURE BY WALLENBERG] (with) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére [Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew]
Schutz-Pass for Alice Rappaport [INITIALED BY WALLENBERG & SIGNED BY DANIELSSON] (with) Letter for Safe Passage for Alice Rappaport [WITH FULL SIGNATURE BY WALLENBERG] (with) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére [Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew]
Schutz-Pass for Alice Rappaport [INITIALED BY WALLENBERG & SIGNED BY DANIELSSON] (with) Letter for Safe Passage for Alice Rappaport [WITH FULL SIGNATURE BY WALLENBERG] (with) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére [Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew]
Schutz-Pass for Alice Rappaport [INITIALED BY WALLENBERG & SIGNED BY DANIELSSON] (with) Letter for Safe Passage for Alice Rappaport [WITH FULL SIGNATURE BY WALLENBERG] (with) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére [Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew]

Schutz-Pass for Alice Rappaport [INITIALED BY WALLENBERG & SIGNED BY DANIELSSON] (with) Letter for Safe Passage for Alice Rappaport [WITH FULL SIGNATURE BY WALLENBERG] (with) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére [Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew]

Budapest: Königlich Schwedische Gesandtschaft / Sicherheitspolizei und Sicherheitsdienst (SD) in Budapest - Magyar kir. Rendőrség Budapest főkapitánya, 1944. Original document. Loose_leaf. Collection of three poignant documents pertaining to the Holocaust in Hungary, Swedish ambassador Carl Ivan Danielsson, and Embassy Secretary Raoul Wallenberg's efforts to rescue Jews from the Nazis, and the living conditions of a Jewish worker in Budapest:

1) Schutz-Pass: Folio. One loose leaf printed on recto only, as issued. Original Schutz-Pass (Protective passeport) issued for Alice Rappaport, born November 30, 1926, with her b/w photograph paper-clipped on upper left corner of the document (size: 1 3/8 x 1"). The passport was designed by Raoul Wallenberg, and printed in blue and yellow (the Swedish national colors), with text in German and Hungarian, stating that the named person will travel for repatriation to Sweden and until departure is under the protection of the Swedish embassy. With the stamped seal of the Swedish embassy in Budapest. Press numbered at the top: Nr. 90/95. Signed by Wallenberg* as often with a simple pen-mark, and counter-signed by the Swedish ambassador to Hungary, Carl Ivan Danielsson (both would later receive Israel's honorific title of "Righteous among the Nations" for risking their lives during the Holocaust to save Jews from extermination by the Nazis). The Swedish legation succeeded in negotiating with the Germans that the bearers of these protective passes or "Schutz-Passes" would be treated as Swedish citizens and exempt from wearing the yellow Star of David on their chest. This document measures 13 2/8 x 8 2/8", has folding marks, and is slightly age-toned along edges. The paper clip used to affix Alice Rappaport's photograph is rusted, thus affecting partly the picture. Document in overall good+ to very good condition.

2) Letter for Safe Passage: Oblong octavo (size: 5 7/8 x 8 2/8"). One loose leaf printed on recto only, as issued. Typed and printed document, on letterhead of the Royal Swedish Embassy in Budapest, numbered "R.: 03413," "Sp.: 9095," "Liste: 316," and bearing the stamped seal of the embassy, signed in full by Raoul Wallenberg. In Hungarian it reads: "To the National Central Authority for Supervising Foreigners, Budapest: We have the honor to inform you that the Swedish Embassy kindly requests to give to the named person, an exemption from wearing the yellow badge (star). The Embassy confirms that the bilateral agreements with Sweden regarding the relevant edict is applied. Budapest, September 26, 1944 / Yours sincerely, / [signed] Raoul Wallenberg / acting for the Swedish Royal Ambassador. The Swedish Royal Secretary of the Embassy." Text in Hungarian. Document in overall very good condition. These two documents, always kept together (as evidenced by folds and paper clip marks), saved the life of a 17 year-old Jewish girl from Budapest.

3 ) Igazolvány megkülönböztető jelzés viselésére kötelezett zsidó személy részére (Work Identification Card for an Hungarian Jew): 16mo (4 x 6 6/8"). [4]pp. Original printed stiff wrappers. Jewish worker's ID allowing the named person freedom of movement from 8am to 8pm, within the city of Budapest. Workers were warned that without that card, one would be considered unemployed, and therefore subjected to possible deportation and extermination. It had to be kept in a protective folder, and any alterations made to the card meant punishment to the holder. Unlike the bearers of Schutz-Passes, who were treated as Swedish citizen, and were exempted to wear the yellow star, the holder of this card was considered as a mere Hungarian Jewish worker, and therefore, was obliged to wear the yellow star of David. Card press-numbered at the upper left corner of front cover: "3274 / 1944." This ID, dated August 12, 1944, was issued for Ignác Kardos, born on February 11, 1885, with his b/w photograph (size: 2 x 2 1/8") affixed at verso of front cover, with the stamp of the Sicherheitspolizei** und Sicherheitsdienst*** (SD) (the German security police and intelligence service in Budapest), and the Magyar kir. Rendőrség Budapest főkapitánya (Budapest Police Department). The document is handsigned by the Chief of the SiPo (Langbehn SS-Hauptsturmführer), and stamp-signed by the Chief of the Budapest Police Department. Moderate age-toning and creasing along edges. Text in Hungarian, with some German. Pass in overall good+ to very good condition. vg. Item #39105

* Raoul Gustaf Wallenberg (1912 - disappeared 17 January 1945 - died in a Soviet prison in 1947) was a Swedish architect, businessman, diplomat and humanitarian. He is widely celebrated for saving tens of thousands of Jews in Nazi-occupied Hungary during the Holocaust from Hungarian Fascists and the Nazis during the later stages of World War II. While serving as Sweden's special envoy in Budapest between July and December 1944, Wallenberg issued protective passports and sheltered Jews in buildings designated as Swedish territory. On 17 January 1945, during the Siege of Budapest by the Red Army, Wallenberg was detained by Soviet authorities on suspicion of espionage and subsequently disappeared. He was later reported to have died on 17 July 1947 while imprisoned by communist authorities and KGB secret police in the Lubyanka, the KGB headquarters and affiliated prison in Moscow. The motives behind Wallenberg's arrest and imprisonment by the Soviet government, along with questions surrounding the circumstances of his death and his possible ties to US intelligence, remain mysterious and are the subject of continued speculation. On November 26, 1963, Israel recognized Raoul Wallenberg as Righteous Among the Nations. His mother asked not to receive the honors in his name, believing that her son would one day return. Only after her death, in 1979, was a tree planted in Wallenberg’s honor in the Avenue of the Righteous at Yad Vashem. In 1987 Wallenberg was awarded honorary Israeli citizenship. He was also awarded honorary American citizenship by the United States Congress. This motion was promoted by Congressman Tom Lantos, whose life was saved by Wallenberg. In his address, delivered by his daughter at the UN Holocaust remembrance events in January 2008, Lantos paid tribute to Wallenberg: "During the Nazi occupation, this heroic young diplomat left behind the comfort and safety of Stockholm to rescue his fellow human beings in the hell that was wartime Budapest. He had little in common with them: he was a Lutheran, they were Jewish; he was a Swede, they were Hungarians. And yet with inspired courage and creativity he saved the lives of tens of thousands of men, women and children by placing them under the protection of the Swedish crown."

** The Sicherheitspolizei (English: Security Police), often abbreviated as SiPo, was a term used in Germany for their security police. In the Nazi era it was used to describe the state political and criminal investigation security agencies. It was made up by the combined forces of the Gestapo (secret state police) and the Kripo (criminal police) between 1936 and 1939. As a formal agency, the SiPo was folded into the RSHA in 1939, but the term continued to be used informally until the end of the Third Reich.

*** Sicherheitsdienst (English: Security Service), full title Sicherheitsdienst des Reichsführers-SS, or SD, was the intelligence agency of the SS and the Nazi Party in Nazi Germany. The organization was the first Nazi Party intelligence organization to be established and was considered a sister organization with the Gestapo, which the SS had infiltrated heavily after 1934. Between 1933 and 1939, the SD was administered as an independent SS office, after which it was transferred to the authority of the Reich Main Security Office (Reichssicherheitshauptamt, or RSHA), as one of its seven departments/offices. Its first director, Reinhard Heydrich, intended for the SD to bring every single individual within the Third Reich's reach under "continuous supervision." Following Germany's defeat in World War II, the SD was declared a criminal organisation at the Nuremberg Trials, along with the rest of Reinhard Heydrich's Reich Security Main Office (including the Gestapo) both individually and as branches of the SS in the collective. Heydrich's successor, Ernst Kaltenbrunner, was sentenced to death for war crimes at the Nuremberg Tribunals and hanged in 1946.

Price: $27,500.00

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