Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]. Hannes Meyer.
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]
Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]

Bauhaus: Vierteljahr-Zeitschrift für Gestaltung Nr. 1-2-3-4, Jahrgang III (4 issues, 1929 complete) [THREE ISSUES FROM THE PERSONAL LIBRARY OF AND SIGNED BY IWAO YAMAWAKI]

Dessau: Bauhaus Dessau, 1929. First edition. Softcover. Quarto. 31, [1], 31, [1], 31, [1], 31, [1]pp. Original photo-illustrated wrappers. Iwao Yamawaki's stamp (Iwao Yamawaki, Architect & Associates: 4-3-24 Komaba Meguroku Tokyo) and signature on upper margin of front covers of vols. 1,2,4. A collection of all "Bauhaus" magazines published by Bauhaus Dessau in 1929. The striking magazines were designed by Bauhaus teachers and students. The collection features remarkable examples of what became identified as Bauhaus style* in art, photography, architecture, typography and design.

The first issue is mainly devoted to art, and contains b/w photographic reproductions of sculptures by Gerhart Marcks and Ewald Mataré, and paintings by Otto Schlemmer, and three of the four founders of the Blau Vier**: Lyonel Feininger, Vasily Kandisky, and Paul Klee. Each of the 4 reproductions with facsimile signatures of the artists. The second volume deals with photography, and reproduces b/w photographs by Lotte Gerson, Andreas Feininger, Werner Feist, Naftali Rubinstein, Walter Peterhans, Walter Funkat, and Fritz Kuhr. The third volume focuses on advertising and professional service exhibits, Hans Riedel, children's drawings, Lene Schmidt-Nonne, and creative education, H. F. Geist, including a review of Paul Klee's painting "Kindheit der Iris," Ernst Kallei. The issue also includes 3 extraordinary b/w photographs each of Oskar Schlemmer's Bauhaus theater productions and Hannes Meyer's State School of the ADGB. Issue No. 4 is mainly devoted to the art of Oskar Schlemmer. The architectural designs contained in this collection are from Mart Stam, Arieh Sharon (vol. 1), Ludwig Karl Hilberseimer (vol. 2), and Hannes Meyer (vol. 3).

Magazines partly rubbed along edges, and slightly foxed on covers. Tail of spine of issues 1,2 and 4 bumped at tail, thus slightly affecting pages throughout. Issue 3 with some rust stains from staple binding two inch closed tear at head of spine, one inch at tail plus 5 inch craese near bottom of front cover. Text in German. Wrappers in overall good, interior in good+ condition. g to g+. Item #38286

* The Bauhaus was known for its innovative teaching methods and new approach towards art, architecture, and crafts. It was founded in 1919 in Weimar with the city's financial support. In 1928, due to loss of funding, it moved to Dessau where it remained in operation until 1932. The school reopened for a short time in Berlin, but was closed in 1933 by the newly formed Nazi government. László Moholy-Nagy attempted to revive Bauhaus teachings in Chicago in 1937. Under its first director, the German architect Walter Gropius, new methods of instruction were developed at the Bauhaus based on the premise that art, crafts, and architecture must unite with technology and modern industry geared towards mass production, not only to meet the needs of society, but also to create and shape a new lifestyle. The ideas taught at the Bauhaus and the artistic output of its students and teachers contributed significantly to subsequent developments in architecture, art, industrial and interior design, graphic design and typography. Gropius led the Bauhaus until 1928. His successor was the Swiss architect Hannes Meyer, known for his new functionalist approach to architecture and political views leaning towards Communism. Under political pressure, Meyer was forced to resign in 1930. He was replaced by the German architect Mies van der Rohe. During the Weimar years typography increasingly gained prominence in the work of the Bauhaus teacher László Moholy-Nagy and his student, the graphic designer Herbert Bayer, but a formal workshop for typography was not part of the Bauhaus until 1925. After the school's relocation to Dessau, under Bayer's charge, the newly installed workshop developed into a professional studio for graphic design and commercial art. The study of the communicative potential of letter forms and typographic layout was part of a basic curriculum in the mechanics of visual education. Such innovations as the elimination of capital letters, and the replacement of the archaic Gothic alphabet used in German printing by a modern "cosmopolitan" font, and the concept of composition based on strong geometrical elements and expressive values of colors, testify to a move away from individually handcrafted and traditionally shaped goods towards objects meeting functional requirements suitable for mass production. In this regard, what became known as Bauhaus typography was also part of the social and political reform taking place at the school.

** Die Blaue Vier, ( German: “The Blue Four”) successor group of Der Blaue Reiter (“The Blue Rider”; 1911–14), formed in 1924 in Germany by the Russian artists Alexey von Jawlensky and Wassily Kandinsky, the Swiss artist Paul Klee, and the American-born artist Lyonel Feininger. At the time of the group’s formation, Kandinsky, Klee, and Feininger were teaching at the Weimar Bauhaus. Members of the group were united by a desire to exhibit together rather than by similarity of style. Between 1925 and 1934 exhibitions of their work were mounted in the United States, Mexico, and Germany.

Price: $7,500.00

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