Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller

Eric Chaim Kline, Bookseller
Huldigungsschrift für Georg Karl von Fechenbach, Fürstbischof von Würzburg [MANUSCRIPT]. Judenschaft von Veitshöchheim.
Huldigungsschrift für Georg Karl von Fechenbach, Fürstbischof von Würzburg [MANUSCRIPT]
Huldigungsschrift für Georg Karl von Fechenbach, Fürstbischof von Würzburg [MANUSCRIPT]
Huldigungsschrift für Georg Karl von Fechenbach, Fürstbischof von Würzburg [MANUSCRIPT]

Huldigungsschrift für Georg Karl von Fechenbach, Fürstbischof von Würzburg [MANUSCRIPT]

Würzburg: NP, 1795. Manuscript. Hardcover. Quarto (folio). Unpaginated, 6 leaves. Original pink silk-covered boards with gilt stamped borders. Manuscript on soft vellum. First leaf with floral border design heightened in gold. The handwriting is very carefully executed and perfectly preserved. In this original document the Jewish community of Veitshöchheim expresses obedience, pays homage to and blesses Georg Karl v. Fechenbach (1749-1805), who was the last prince-bishop of Würzburg in Franconia, a region situated in northern Bavaria. This contemporary manuscript documents the formal cooperative relationship between the Jewish community and the regional government and authority through the Catholic church in the person of the prince-bishop. Veitshöchheim is a municipality in the district of Würzburg, in Bavaria, Germany. It is situated on the right bank of the Main, 6 kilometres (4 mi) northwest of Würzburg. In the town is Schloss Veitshöchheim, which was the summer palace of the Prince-Bishops of Würzburg and built in 1680–82. The palace was enlarged to its present appearance in 1753 by Balthasar Neumann. The gardens were redesigned for the Prince-Bishop by Adam Friedrich von Seinsheim (1755–1779), with lakes and waterworks, and filled with hundreds of allegorical sandstone sculptures from the workshops of the court sculptors Ferdinand Tietz and Johann Peter Wagner. The town has a railway station near the palace with a former royal pavilion
Jews in Veitshöchheim were first mentioned in the 17th Century. In 1674 there were three Jewish families, only four years later its five, in 1703 eight and 22 families in 1719. Until the beginning of the 19th Century those families were traders of goods and farm animals. Those Families created a very active community life. The congregation had a synagogue, a Mikwe (a ritual bath), and a Cheder (a religious school). The teacher at the cheder was also responsible for the observance of slaughtering according to Jewish law and functioned as the Shaliakh Tzibbur (prayer leader). The congregation used the cemetary of the district of Laudenbach. In 1910 were 70 Jewish people living in Veitshöchheim. Besides being involved within the activities of the general community, there was a very active Jewish life: in the 20th century Fanny Stern founded the Women's League in 1924 and a Chevra Kaddisha was founded in 1895. The last president of the board is since 1932 Ernst Kahn, who remained there till the deportation of the last member of the Jewish congregation in 1942. In 1933 there are 36 members left, only 1.6 % of 2.285 citizens. Until 1939 24 members emigrated and the remainder pretty soon lost their sustenance and lived in poverty. On November 9th, 1938 the windows of all Jewish houses and one shop were destroyed. In February 1942 seven persons were left, only one woman, who lived in a "Mischehe" (Mixed Marriage) survived in Veitshöchheim. Text in German (Gothic script). Binding with some rippling to silk. Binding in overall good, interior in very good condition. g to vg. Item #21897

Price: $7,500.00

See all items in Manuscript, Objects